firefox

Browsers and the HTML accessKey

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Background

As browsers evolve, changes have been made with how the HTML “accessKey” attribute works. There are differences across platforms for the same browser version as well as differences across browser versions on the same platform.  There are even some cases where the exact same browser treats accessKey differently for button elements vs. anchor elements!  This post shows some examples of how to invoke the accessKey and what the behavior is.

Sample button and anchor HTML using the “accessKey” attribute

<html>
<body>
<button onclick="javascript:alert('hi button with onclick')"
        accessKey="r">Button t<u style="color:red">r</u>y me</button>
<a href="javascript:;" onclick="alert('hi anchor with onclick');return false;"
        accessKey="o">Anchor with <b style="color:red">o</b>nclick</a>
</body>
</html>

How different browsers handle the above accessKey letters for button and anchor elements

Browser Operating System Key Combination Button Behavior Anchor Behavior
Chrome 7.0.517.41 Linux Alt + letter Clicks the button (3) Clicks the anchor (3)
Chrome 7.0.517.41 Mac OS X Control + Option + letter Clicks the button (3) Clicks the anchor (3)
Chrome 7.0.517.41 Windows Alt + letter Clicks the button (3) Clicks the anchor (3)
Firefox 1.5 Windows Alt + letter Clicks the button (1) Unknown
Firefox 2 Linux Alt + Shift + letter Clicks the button (1) Clicks the anchor
Firefox 2 Mac OS X Control + letter Clicks the button (1) Clicks the anchor
Firefox 2 Windows Alt + Shift + letter Clicks the button (1) Unknown
Firefox 3 Linux Alt + Shift + letter Clicks the button (1) Clicks the anchor
Firefox 3 Mac OS X Control + letter Clicks the button (1) Clicks the anchor
Firefox 3 Windows Alt + Shift + letter Clicks the button (1) Clicks the anchor
Internet Explorer 6 Windows Alt + letter Sets focus on the button (2) Unknown
Internet Explorer 7 Windows Alt + letter Sets focus on the button (2) Sets focus on the anchor (2)
Internet Explorer 8 Windows Alt + letter Clicks the button (3) Sets focus on the anchor (2)
Internet Explorer 9 (beta) Windows Alt + letter Clicks the button (3) Sets focus on the anchor (2)
Safari 3.1.2 Mac OS X Control + Option + letter Clicks the button (3) Clicks the anchor (3)
Safari 3.1.2 Windows Alt + letter Clicks the button (3) Clicks the anchor (3)
Safari 5.0.2 Mac OS X Control + Option + letter Clicks the button (3) Clicks the anchor (3)
Safari 5.0.2 Windows Alt + letter Clicks the button (3) Clicks the anchor (3)

 

  • Red = Different behavior for buttons and anchors
  • Comment 1 = To just set focus on the button/anchor, change your about:config setting for the “accessibility.accesskeycausesactivation” user preference.
  • Comment 2 = Press Enter to click the button/anchor
  • Comment 3 = There appears to be no built-in mechanism to just set focus on the button/anchor.  The component handling the click event would be responsible for setting focus while handling the click.

NFS Network URLs on a Mac

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In Mac OS X, if someone gives you a Linux path that looks like:

/net/server/path/to/some/folder/

you can load that folder by swapping out “/net/” with “nfs://” and using a feature of the Mac OS X Finder.  In the Finder, go to:

Go - Connect to server...

And then specify the server address of:

nfs://server/path/to/some/folder/

If you are allowed to connect, a drive will be mounted on your desktop.

On a related note.  If you are using Firefox and come across one of these “nfs://” URLs, Firefox may not automatically mount the drive for you or even prompt you for an application to handle that URL.  Instead, you will need to tell Firefox that you want the Finder to handle those kinds of URLs.

I have tested these instructions on Firefox 3.6:

  1. In Firefox’s address bar, go to:
    about:config
  2. If you have never been there before, it might warn you about editing these settings.
  3. Once you get past the warning and can see a table listing all of your browser settings, right-click anywhere in that table and choose:
    New - Boolean
  4. For the name, specify:
    network.protocol-handler.expose.nfs
  5. For the value, specify:
    false

The next time you try to click one of those links, Firefox will prompt you for a program to handle it and then that program will launch the appropriate network drive.  At least on a Mac, you will need to choose:

/System/Library/CoreServices/Finder.app

Additional information on protocol handling in Firefox can be found at:

http://kb.mozillazine.org/Register_protocol